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The Easy Way To Determining Your Calorie Intake

February 16, 2019 by Sayan

Post-2

There are several different ways to determine how many daily calories are right for you, and they get a little more difficult as they get more accurate.

The first way, if you're not inclined toward doing much math, is quite simple. It's commonly called the "10 Rule". Here's how to use it: You multiply your bodyweight by a certain number (according to your goals and activity level) and you get the amount of calories you need to eat every day.

For fat loss, use this table:

If you are...

Then multiply your bodyweight by

Sedentary (non-physical job, don't exercise

regularly)

10

Lightly active (exercise a couple of times a

week, or have a physical job but don't exercise)

11

Very active (have a physical job and exercise, or

have a non-physical job and exercise 6-7 times a

week)

12


Following this formula, if you were a 180 pound man, you would eat 1800 calories if you
were sedentary, 1980 calories if you were lightly active, and 2160 calories if you were very active.

If you're very overweight/obese (30+ pounds to lose), use this chart:

If you are...

 

Then multiply your bodyweight by

Sedentary (non-physical job, don't exercise

regularly)

8

Lightly active (exercise a couple of times a

week, or have a physical job but don't exercise)

9

Very active (have a physical job and exercise, or

have a non-physical job and exercise 6-7 times a

week)

10


Important: If these calculations put you below 1200 calories, do not use the calculation.
Simply eat at 1200 calories per day. (E.g. If your calculation tells you to eat 1120 calories per day, eat 1200. But if it says to eat 1220, then of course eat 1220.)\

If you've already lost the weight you want to lose, and are just interested in maintaining your weight (and lean muscle mass) use this table:

If you are...

 

Then multiply your bodyweight by

Sedentary (non-physical job, don't exercise

regularly)

13

Lightly active (exercise a couple of times a

week, or have a physical job but don't exercise)

14-15 (make small adjustments according to

your measurements)

Very active (have a physical job and exercise, or

have a non-physical job and exercise 6-7 times a

week)

16


Following this formula, if you were a 180 pound man, you would eat 2340 calories if you
were sedentary, 2520-2700 calories if you were lightly active, and 2880 calories if you were very active.

Step 1: Your BMR (Basal Metabolic Rate)

To get better, more accurate, body-specific results, you'll need to do a little more math and learn some other methods. This will definitely pay off in the long run.

First things first: You'll need to calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate. Your BMR is how
many calories your body burns everyday just to keep alive - basically, if you were laying in bed all day with no activity, how many calories would your body burn?

To figure this out, you'll have to do a little math. Have no fear! The equation is easy with a piece of scratch paper and a calculator (or in the bonus "So Easy A Caveman Can Do It" Calculator.)

Figuring out your BMR is different for men and women, because men biologically have
denser muscles than women have, and thus men have faster metabolisms. We'll start with the women first:

How to find your BMR - For Ladies

This is the equation you'll start with: 655 + X + Y - Z. Now, you've got to plug in the
values for X, Y and Z. Here's how to do that:

1. Weigh yourself in the morning, before you've eaten or had anything to drink. Write
down your weight, then multiply it by 4.35. This is X.
2. Write down your height in inches (if you're 5'4", the average American woman's height, then you're 64 inches.) Multiply this by 4.7. This is Y.
3. Write down how many years old you are. If you're coming up on a birthday in the next
three months, go ahead and round up. Multiply your age by 4.7. This is Z.

Some people find this easier to understand: 655 + (4.35 x weight in pounds) + (4.7 x height in inches) - (4.7 x age in years) = BMR.

Let's take a look at how it works in action. Here's a sample woman:

She weighs 140 pounds.

140 X 4.35

609

She is 5'4" (64 inches.) 

64X 4.7

301

She is 30 years old

30 X 4.7 

141


Now, she plugs in all of the pieces:

655

+

609

+

301

-

141

=

1424.4


This woman's BMR is 1424 (rounded down for sake of simplicity.)

How to find your BMR - For Guys

Gentlemen, here is your equation: 66 + X + Y - Z. Now, we've got to figure out the values for X, Y and Z.
1. Weigh yourself in the morning, before you've eaten or had anything to drink. Write
down your weight and multiply it by 6.23. This is X.
2. Write down your height in inches. Multiply this by 12.7, and you have Y.
3. Write down your age in years and multiply your age by 6.8. This is Z.

Here's the equation in something more closely resembling English: 66 + (6.23 x weight in pounds) + (12.7 x height in inches) - (6.8 x age in years).

Let's see it in action. These are a sample male's statistics:

He weighs 190 pounds.

190 X 6.23

1183.7

He is 5'11" (71 inches.)

71 X 12.7

901.7

He is 30 years old

30 X 6.8

204


Since he's a man, he'll (obviously) be using the male formula. So now, he plugs in all of the values:

66

+

1183.7

+

901.7

-

204

=

1947.4


And learns that his BMR is 1947.4

Step 2: The Harris-Benedict Equation

You know that your BMR is the calories your body burns only for basic functions. But you don't lay in bed all day, every day. You get up and make breakfast, go to work and do all kinds of things.

So you can't go off your BMR alone. Thus, you need to figure out how many calories you burn every day on average. This is called you Total Daily Energy Expenditure, or TDEE for short. It is the amount of calories you need to eat to maintain your current bodyweight.

And the physical activity you perform every day determines the speed of your metabolism - the harder you work, the harder it works. And the harder you work, the higher your TDEE.

The Harris-Benedict Equation is how you determine this number. It's very simple, and it works the same way for men and women. Here it is:
 

IF YOU ARE...

MULTIPLY YOUR BMR BY...

Sedentary (little or no daily exercise AND you do not have a

physical job)

1.2

Lightly Active (exercise at least 40 minutes, 1-3 days/week

AND you do not have a physical job)

1.375

Moderately Active (exercise at least 40 minutes 4-5 days/week

AND you do not have a physical job.) OR (little or no daily

exercise but you have a physical job)

1.55

Very Active (exercise at least 40 minutes 6-7 days/week AND

you do not have a physical job) OR (exercise at least 40 minutes,

1-3 days/week AND you have a physical job)

1.725

Extra Active (exercise at least 40 minutes 6-7 days/week AND

have a physical job OR exercise at least 80 minutes 6-7

days/week and do not have a physical job)

1.9


If you didn't notice already, here's one thing you should know:

  • There are diminishing returns after you've surpassed the very active category. To get to the 1.9 Harris-Benedict multiplier, you've got to either train twice as long, or go get a job in construction or as a professional athlete. The takeaway here is that no one needs to kill themselves at the gym, they just have to be consistent. Show up and stay long enough to get (and keep) your heart rate elevated.


Interested in losing weight? Then click below to see the exact steps I took to lose weight and keep it off for good...

Read the next article about "Calculating A Weight Loss Deficit"

Moving forward, there are several other articles/topics I'll share so you can lose weight even faster, and feel great doing it.


Below is a list of these topics and you can use this Table of Contents to jump to the part that interests you the most.


Learn more by visiting our website here: invigoratenow.com


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